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Justine Anderson completed her Masters degree in voice at the Victorian College of the Arts in 2008 and completed a fellowship at A.N.A.M. in 2015.
She has had wide performance experience as both a soloist and ensemble singer and has a particular passion for contemporary music, having performed works by masters such as Boulez, Berio, Grisey, Feldman, Furrer, Gifford, Salonen and Ligeti. Her work with new music groups include concerts with Bang on a Can, Arcko Symphonic Ensemble, Icon Trio, Hutes, Astra, Melbourne University’s New Music Studio, Forrest Collective and as a guest artist at A.N.A.M.
Justine is principal soprano with the Melbourne based opera company Emotionworks opera and her roles include Pamina in The Magic Flute, Michaela in Carmen, The Witch in Hansel and Gretel, Tosca in Tosca and Violetta in La Traviata. In 2013 she played Brunhilda as part of a collaboration between Emotionworks and Opera Australia’s Melbourne Ring Festival.

Other highlights include a performance as a nightclub singer in the short film ‘The Black Pine Road’, a role in the play Orphanage of Animals (Awarded the Medal of Ulm, Germany 2012) and Matthew Hindson’s opera Love Death Music Plants. Justine has also worked with Inventi Chamber Ensemble and as a soloist in various Oratorio performances. Festival performances include B.I.F.E.M, Canberra Festival, Melbourne International Arts Festival, Port Fairy Spring Festival, Darebin Music Feast and Melbourne Fringe Festival.

In 2008 Justine recorded for the ABC the Australian premiere of the Alberto Ginastera work Cantata for Magic America as part of the Simplot International Masterclass Series. In 2016 Justine recorded Jonathan Mills Ethereal Eye and performed this work as part of the Melbourne Festival. In 2017 Justine’s group Icon Trio, will accept an invitation to tour Scotland with their Scot’s Haiku project.
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nirmali-fennNirmali Fenn is a Sri Lankan-born Australian composer. She received her initial music education in Australia from the universities of New South Wales and Melbourne, graduating with high distinction. With the support of a prestigious Clarendon Fund Scholarship, she later read music at Oxford University, U.K. She has worked on the faculties of the University of Hong Kong, New York University, University of New South Wales and currently works at Yale-NUS College, Singapore.

Nirmali’s music often involves a lot of theatre and she has collaborated with some of Asia’s most respected choreographers, such as Pun Siu Fai and Daniel Leung. Her collaboration with the Guangdong Modern Dance Company opened the 9th Guangdong Dance Festival in Guangzhou, China.

Nirmali has served as composer-in-residence at a number of major European festivals, most notably the Lakes District Summer Music Festival in the U.K. and the Saxophone Habanera Festival in Poitiers, France. Of the first performance of her song cycle Over Exposed at Abbaye Royaumont in Paris, Le Monde praised it as “standing out in the genre of ‘songs’ of today” and La Croix described it as “deeply moving”. Her compositions have been performed by the Arditti String Quartet, Ensemble Cairn, Ensemble Linea, the Kuss Quartet, Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, Tin Alley String Quartet, Sounds Underground, the Endymion Ensemble, the Hong Kong New Music Ensemble, Ensemble Concorde, the S.E.M Ensemble, Prague Modern and the Eastman Broadband Ensemble.

Through her music, Nirmali often challenges performers to ‘see’ with their ears and construct spatial ‘views’ of their surroundings. She believes that sound is one tool to give audiences the chance to experience the volume of the space in which they exist.

“Your music is like a work by a great artist. From every perspective, the proportions are perfect”
Wolfgang Rihm

2016-11-21-train-platform-selfieA sound can evoke a time, a place, a cultural moment, or a worldview.  As someone who loves both the Western classical tradition and the world of pop culture, Alex Temple (b. 1983) has always felt uncomfortable with stylistic hierarchies and the idea of a pure musical language.  She prefers to look for points of connection between things that aren’t supposed to belong together, distorting and combining iconic sounds to create new meanings — often in service of surreal, cryptic, or fantastical stories.  She’s particularly interested in reclaiming socially disapproved-of (“cheesy”) sounds, playing with the boundary between funny and frightening, and investigating lost memories and secret histories.

Alex’s work has been performed by a variety of soloists and ensembles, including Mellissa Hughes, Timothy Andres, Mark Dancigers, the American Composers Orchestra, the Chicago Composers Orchestra, Spektral Quartet, Fifth House Ensemble, Cadillac Moon Ensemble, and Ensemble de Sade.  She has also performed her own works for voice and electronics in venues such as Roulette, Exapno, the Tank, Monkeytown, Galapagos Art Space, Gallery Cabaret, and Constellation.  As the keyboardist for the chamber-rock group The Sissy-Eared Mollycoddles, she’s performed at the South by Southwest Festival and at Chicago’s Green Mill Cocktail Lounge;  and with a·pe·ri·od·ic, an ensemble dedicated to the performance of indeterminate music in the tradition of John Cage, she’s made sounds using her voice, synthesizers and various household objects.

Alex got her BA from Yale University in 2005, where she studied with Kathryn Alexander, John Halle and Matthew Suttor, and released two albums of electronic music on a microlabel that she ran out of her dorm room.  In 2007 she completed her MA at University of Michigan, where she studied with Erik Santos and visiting professors Michael Colgrass, Tania León and Betsy Jolas, as well as collaborating with a troupe of dancers and playing in an indie bossa-nova band.  After she left Ann Arbor, she spent two years in New York, working as the program manager for the New York Youth Symphony’s Making Score program for young composers.  Now she’s pursuing a DMA at Northwestern University, where she’s studied with Hans Thomalla and Jay Alan Yim, and taught aural skills, theory, composition for non-majors, and private composition lessons.  She’s currently working on a podcast-opera called End, about TV production company logos and the end of the world.

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Marc Yeats

Composer and visual artist Marc Yeats has gained international renown over the last 20 years, through his works being commissioned and performed by world famous orchestras such as The Halle, London Sinfonietta, BBC and Tokyo City Philharmonic’s, New York Miniaturists Ensemble and many more. His work has often been featured in BBC broadcast commissions, as well as in Germany, US, New Zealand and elsewhere.

The chance to be one of just 10 participants at the famous Hoy Summer School introduced him to the legendary Sir Peter Maxwell Davis, who maintained a keen interest in Marc’s career up to his recent sad passing. Indeed, it was he who conducted Marc’s first commission for the Scottish Chamber Orchestra at the St Magnus Festival almost two decades ago.

Among his many compositions are: ‘I See Blue’ (his first orchestral work), ‘the round and square art of memory for piano and orchestra [BBC Philharmonic commission] and ‘My Blood Is As Red As Yours’ commissioned by The Halle to celebrate World Aids Day 2008.

Today, positioned as a leading contemporary composer, Marc is managed by Noel Music Management. He continues to expand his musical horizons in work with mobile technologies and in developing a range of asynchronous structures in his compositions.

HOMOPHONIC! 2017!

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Tickets and details available here.

Homophonic! is back for it’s 6th fabulous year. Come join us at La Mama Courthouse for an evening of new classical music by queer composers. Celebrating sapphic symphonists, homosexual harmonies, and the long and proud tradition of composers being as gay as the day is long.

Classical music has a rich heritage of LGBT musicians and composers, and this concert is celebrating the legacy of those artists by performing the work of 20th and 21st century queer composers, in an exciting program featuring famously gay composers alongside new Australian music that is sure to entertain and enlighten even the most experienced concert goer. And we’re thrilled to be back at La Mama Courthouse, in the bosom of experimental art making of Melbourne.

This year we have a new solo work for Viola by Nirmali Fenn, written for and performed by Phoebe Green; a delectable low trio of two bass flutes and cello by Madelyn Byrne; and an exciting new septet by Marc Yeats, among other treats for your ears.

We’re bringing the disco ball to the concert hall! Come along to hear some of Melbourne’s most in demand classical musicians play some outlandishly fabulous music, and experience the sound world of the LGBT composers of today.

Performers: Ben Opie, Laila Engle, Kim Tan, Belinda Woods, Edward Ferris, Sydney Braunfeld, Allison Wright, Zachary Johnston, Merewyn Bramble, Phoebe Green, Jennifer Mills, Stephanie Arnold, Justine Anderson, Matthew Horsely, Laura Tanata, and Miranda Hill.

Conductor: Steven Hodgson.

Composers: Nirmali Fenn, Marc Yeats, Alex Temple, Amadeus Regucera, Andrew Aronowicz, Naima Fine, Madelyn Byrne, Pauline Oliveros,

Directed and presented by Miranda Hill.

 

It’s a Monday and Tuesday night in January! What better time to come enjoy a degustation of new musical creations? It’s sure to become your new favourite midsumma tradition.

See you there!

<3, Team Homophonic!

What a gig! Amazing music, performances to die for, (we’re looking at you, percussion quartet) and the only big band where the lead trumpet was played on oboe.

As we ramp up for Homophonic! #6! Here’s a couple of photos from last years show to whet your appetite. All photos by BJ Hill.

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Jennifer Mills is an ex-violinist who plays cello. She has performed in many creative spheres including as a classical soloist, orchestral and chamber musician, and as an improviser, on stages or in studios, galleries, warehouses and tents.
Based in Melbourne, Jennifer undertook initial studies at the Victorian College of the Arts under Josephine Vains, Rohan DeKorte and Timothy Walden. She recently completed her second Masters degree at Monash University with Svetlana Bogosavljevic, focusing on orchestral studies.
In addition to her freelance work in Melbourne, Jennifer has toured nationally and internationally with Co*Opera, and given performances in France, Russia, New Zealand and Malaysia.

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Andrew began singing in church choirs at age 7 and delighted many with his boy soprano stylings (and blonde undercut) as a chorister with the the National Boys Choir in the early ’90s. Andrew completed his Bachelor of Music at ACU, majoring in vocal performance and choral conducting.

In 2011 Andrew toured Europe with the Australian Chamber Choir, his boyish looks and enthusiasm for potato salad winning the hearts and minds of Hausfrauen from Cologne to Leipzig.

In his spare time he volunteers coordinating string and vocal ensembles at St Paul’s church, Box Hill, and assists as a tenor soloist in the church’s Bach Cantata project.

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Photo: Laki Sideris

 

Gemma Horbury is a performer, artist and educator with a passion for music that defies genre: her work shifts between technological innovation and tradition, yet is underpinned by deep connections to sustainability and developing individual and community capacity through the arts. Gemma is musical director of world music ensemble Orkeztra Glasso Bashalde and regularly performs with groups including Lo-res and Tek Tek Ensemble.

Her diverse portfolio includes performing as soloist with the West Australian Symphony Orchestra, co-ordinating a TV channel for adolescent hospital patients, producing a skateboarding DVD, and studying musical instrument making and historic performance practice in the United Kingdom.

Her irrepressible enthusiasm for all things creative has seen her awarded for her visual art (Northern Exposure), music teaching (Yamaha Jazz Spirit Award) and performance –  in 2015 she was crowned Australia’s “Queen of Improvisation” – our very own Improv Idol.

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Photo: Cameron Jamieson

Kaylie Melville is a Melbourne based percussionist whose practice focuses on ensemble performance and new music. Kaylie has worked with many of Australia’s leading ensembles and orchestras and performed at festivals including the Metropolis New Music Festival, Melbourne Festival, Bendigo International Festival of Exploratory Music, the Adelaide Cabaret Festival, the Salihara Festival (Indonesia), and the Percussive Arts Society’s International Conventional (US). In 2015 Kaylie was selected as a percussion fellow for the Bang on a Can Summer Institute in Massachusetts, and in 2013 Kaylie travelled to the So Percussion Summer Institute at Princeton University (US) where she performed for Steve Reich and premiered works by Princeton composition students.

Kaylie’s recent awards include an Australia Council Artstart Grant, the University of Melbourne’s Professional Pathways Scholarship, and the Australian National Academy of Music’s John and Rosemary MacLeod Traveling Fellowship. She champions new works and experiences for Australian audiences with the Rubiks and Bricolage ensembles, and has performed in numerous Australian and Victorian premieres, including major works by Messiaen and Boulez. Kaylie held the position of Young Artist in Residence with Speak Percussion in 2015, and now co-ordinates Speak’s Sounds Unheard education program for gifted and talented secondary music students. www.kayliemelville.com